Posted by: Audrey Erbes | May 17, 2015

Bay Area Life Science Events for Weeks of May 17-31, 2015

It’s time for another holiday the end of the month so it’s not surprising that there are many meetings this coming week, especially, on Tuesday, May 19th. I’ve also listed meetings for the week of the 24th due to the holiday on the 25th.

Since I haven’t had any new jobs cross my desk this past week, there is no list of jobs at this time.

Bay Area Life Science Events The Next Two Weeks

  • QB3 and UCSF-Stanford CERSI, Monday Mid-day, May 18, 2015; Topic: “Therapeutic Equivalence: The Key Issue For Generic Drug Review;” Speaker: Robert Lionberger, Director of the Office of Research and Standards, Office of Generic Drugs, FDA
  • Bio2Device Group, Tuesday Morning, May 19, 2015; Topic: “Expansion into Europe – Opportunities and Challenges for U.S. Life Sciences Companies;” Speaker: Piet Weinreich, Senior Associate, Osborne Clarke
  • WIB, Tuesday Evening, May 19, 2015; Topic: “ Reimbursements: Successful Solutions to Challenges in Biotech;” Speakers: Marijke Annis (Moderator) M.S.P.H. Founder, Annis & Associates Consulting; Becky Foster, M.P.H. Managed Care and Reimbursement independent consultant; Marianne Laouri, Ph.D. Specialist leader, Deloitte Consulting; Vanessa A. Jacobsen, PharmD, Principal Liason, Health Economics and Outcomes   Research, Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC
  • GGPF, Tuesday Evening, May 19, 2015; Topic: “Polymers Hard at Work in Your Smart Phone;”Speaker: Jeff Gotro, InnoCentrix
  • QB3, Tuesday Early Afternoon, May 19, 2015; Topic: “Turning Science Into Medicine: Working Toward Better Outcomes For Patients, Companies & Society;” Speaker: George Scangos, CEO, Biogen
  • sfAWIS, Wednesday Evening, May 20, 2015; Topic: “Managing Stress: A Mindfulness Approach;” Speaker: Anita Joubel, PhD
  • QB3, May 20, 2015 and June 9, 2015; Event: “QB3 Summer 2015 NSF SBIR Bootcamp;” Instructor: Shauna Farr-Jones, PhD, UCSF/QB3 grant writer
  • JLABS, Wednesday Mid Day, May 27, 2015; Topic: “Out of the Lab and into the Newsroom;” Speakers: (List in formation) Michael Fitzhugh, Staff Writer, BioWorld Today; Stephanie Lee | Senior Technology Reporter, Buzzfeed; Susan Schaeffer, Editor, BioCentury; Carin Canale-Theakston | President and Founder, Canale Communications Inc.
  • BioScience Forum, Wednesday Evening, May 27, 2015; Topic: “First in Human Experience with a Novel Inhibitor of Fatty Acid Synthase for the Treatment of Solid Tumors; Speaker: Merdad Parsey, M.D., Ph.D., Chief Executive Officer, 3-V Biosciences
  • PBSS Workshop, Thursday Afternoon, May 28, 2015; Topic: “Preclinical Development & IND/CTA Filing: DMPK Safety, CMC, Clinical Plans & Regulatory Issues;” Speakers: Tracy Chen, Bert Ho, Kathleen Meyer, Peter Staehr
  • QB3, Thursday Afternoon, May 28, 2015; Topic: “Clinical Research In Challenging Times;”Speaker: Peter Blaisdell, Formerly Executive Director, Global Study Management, Amgen

You can download Audreys Picks May 17, 2015 with complete details on the above and other meetings and conferences through Dec. 2015 by right clicking on the highlighted title.

Audrey

Posted by: Audrey Erbes | May 10, 2015

The Specialty Drug Price War Continues Plus Events and Jobs

In the article “Take a Breath” on the Specialty Drug Pricing Issue…?” published May 2nd, Tom Norton makes a case for why the specialty drug pricing war won’t subside. Our “market” –based health care system doesn’t allow for any of the stakeholders to “take a breath” as the author says. There isn’t going to be any room for negotiation on high pricing. See article at http://www.pharmexec.com/take-breath-specialty-drug-pricing-issue.

Financial gains and costs are the critical factors that drive behavior of all involved parties. The drug companies, patients, insurance companies and pharmaceutical benefit management industry all are under pressure to hold their ground. The PBMs started the assault in 2013 with the launch of Gilead’s Sovaldi. Although there has been some lowering of price, it only came about with lots of pressure.

With the exception of individual patients who just can’t afford high co-pays, all the other U.S. health care players involve stockholders who expect gains in profit each quarter. While Gilead’s stockholders favor keeping the price so high and out of reach of many patients to maintain their record revenues, the others favor lower pricing to not destroy their profit margins for their stockholders as result of paying out so much for especially high drugs.

See “How Gilead ‘Blew Out the Lights’ With Sovaldi” by Tom Norton last November which shows the sales of Sovaldi vs other specialty drugs at http://www.pharmexec.com/how-gilead-blew-out-lights-sovaldi.

I note that this is also an historic time for marketing of prescription drugs when Gilead uses the claim of a “cure” with Sovaldi. This will be interested to follow.

Upcoming Week’s Bay Area Life Science Events

  • JLABS, Tuesday Morning, May 12, 2015; Event: “Meet With… Canaan Partners;” Speaker: Julie Papanek | Principal, Canaan Partners
  • Bio2Device Group, Tuesday Evening, May 12, 2015; Topic: “Medical Device Innovation – From Concept to Commercialization;” Speaker: Barrett Larson, M.D., Physician and Co-Founder & CMO, Stanford Hospital & Clinics & Leaf Healthcare
  • Northern California Discussion Group of ASQ Biomedical, Wed. Evening, May 13, 2015; Event: International Medical Device Regulators Forum (Imdrf) And Medical Device Single Audit Program (Mdsap); Speaker: Ms. Kimberly A. Trautman, Associate Director, International Affairs, Office of the Center Director, CDRH; Moderator: Thi Nguyen, Principal Quality Engineer at TheraNova, LLC, will facilitate the session.
  • HBA, Thursday Morning, May 14, 2015, Event: “2015 Woman of the Year Event – West”
  • CABS, Thursday Evening, May 14, 2015, Topic: Legal Workshop: “Case Studies – How to Protect Against and Avoid Legal Problems on Intellectual Property and Trade Secret in Business Partnerships, Tech Transfers, and Cross-Border Deals;” Speakers: Zheng Liu, Of Counsel, Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe; Tom Nolan, Trial lawyer, NAB Law LLC; Heather Newberry, Government Agent, FBI-San Francisco Division
  • NCC ACRP, Thursday Evening, May 14, 2915; Topic: “State Laws that Impact Good Clinical Practice: Focus on Informed Consent;” Speaker: Paul Below, Director, GCP Training Specialists
  • PBSS Workshop, Friday Afternoon, May 15, 2015; Topic: “Genotoxic Impurities Assessment, Control Strategies and the Regulatory Perspective: Update on ICH M7 Guideline,” Speakers: Bo Shen (Amgen), Mark Powley (FDA), Larry Wigman (Genentech)

You can download Audreys Picks May 10, 2015 with complete details on the above and other meetings and conferences through Dec. 2015 by right clicking on the highlighted titles. Also see JobsThatCrossedMyDeskThrough May 10, 2015 for your information. I list mostly jobs in California posted in the last three weeks but you can also find national listings at the websites mentioned.

Audrey

Posted by: Audrey Erbes | May 10, 2015

Biotech Innovation Progress in China Plus Events and Jobs

In this 2011 piece by 2005 CEO, Jim Greenwood, President and of BIO, “China: The Intersection of Innovation: Biotech is one of China’s “strategic pillars” for meeting its ambitious goals for healthcare access and delivery.”a case is made for progress in innovation in biotech in China. https://www.bio.org/articles/china-intersection-innovation

The editorial is not a detailed research piece on demonstration of progress but, not unexpectedly, promotes BIO’s role in partnering and deal making between their member companies and Chinese companies.

In my earlier blog April 26 (https://audreysnetwork.wordpress.com/2015/04/26/china-lacks-freedom-of-individual-expression-essential-for-innovation-plus-events-and-jobs/) on potential for true innovation in drug development in China I noted that not only necessary regulatory structures were missing but also respect for individual rights and freedom of thought that are necessary for the development of high performance teams that bring truly innovative products to market. The Greenwood piece notes that China hasn’t moved away from the manufacturing focus of success into true R&D development. I’m old enough to remember when Japanese manufactured products were suspect but later known for quality when produced by Japan International companies using quality circles as basis for success. In China exported items are suspect, especially those in food, chemicals and medicine fields. Residents of China buy products that look like foreign products but lack their quality and integrity. They are suspicious that Chinese medicines are contaminated or lack any efficacy.

Japanese companies marketed Western company discoveries and then more recently started to develop home-grown or rather partnership based drugs for sale worldwide. It took years for them to achieve innovation with help of others. I suspect China will benefit greatly from the “sea turtles”—returning Chinese born but Western educated and trained—but without growing domestic scientists in country they will be highly depended on those expatriots who find the regulatory slowness, corruption and lack of individual freedom obstacles to repeating their high performance team successes learned elsewhere.

Highlights of This Coming Week’s Bay Area Life Science Events

  • BioDesign, Monday Evening, May 4, 2015, Event: From the Innovator’s Workbench, Speaker: Tim Ring, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, C.R. Bard
  • Bio2Device Group, Tuesday Morning, May 5, 2015, Topic: “A Compact Device to Better Diagnose and Manage Epilepsy,” Speaker: Aswin Gunasekar. Founder & CEO, Zeto, Inc.
  • ShareVault, Wednesday Morning, May 6, 2015, Topic: What’s Hot & What’s Not in Gene Therapies for Rare Disorders, Moderator: Michael C. Rice, MS, MBA, Senior Consultant, Defined Health; Matthew Porteus, MD; Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Cancer Biology), Stanford University; Paul Gallagher, MBA; President, Compass Strategic Consulting; Stewart Abbot, Ph.D, Executive Director, Integrative Research at Celgene Cellular Therapeutics (CCT)
  • MedPace Medical Device, Thursday Mid Day, May 7, 2015, Topic: “Lunch and Learn Series: Lessons Learned from Executing Complex Medical Device Trials”
  • JLABS, Friday Morning, May 8, 2015, Event: “Meet with National Cancer Institute,” Speaker: Ming Zhao, Ph.D. | Program Director, SBIR Development Center, National Cancer Institute
  • RAPS San Francisco Bay Area Chapter, Friday, May 8, 2015, Topic: “Managing Mobile Application Development under FDA Regulation,” Scheduled presenters include: Kim Tyrrell-Knott, Epstein, Becker Green, Mike Righter, principal, Righter Consulting Group LLC, Kirsten Franco, RAC, project manager, Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Solution, Shilpa Mydur, regulatory consultant
  • CABS, Saturday, May 9, 2015, Event: BioPacific Conference 2015: “Opportunities, Challenges, and Growth – A New Era in Biomedical Innovation and Discovery”

You can download JobsThatCrossedMyDeskThrough May 3, 2015 with complete details on the above and other meetings and conferences through Dec. 2015 by right clicking on the highlighted titles. Also see JobsThatCrossedMyDeskThrough May 3, 2015 for your information. I list mostly jobs in California posted in the last three weeks but you can also find national listings at the websites mentioned.

Audrey

 

 

I was just reading April 10th article Will China Ever See Its Own Blockbuster Drug?” by Anna Rose Welch asking the question as to when China will innovate blockbuster pharma products. The author concludes that China has only two of three essentials necessary to develop innovative drugs—people and money—but not a regulatory framework. I suggest that it also doesn’t have a societal environment of openness and honesty which are essential for any innovation or brainstorming as well. The originality found in Western countries is often attributed to its social fiber and mores—I contend there needs to be freedom of communication and trust.

There’s been a problem in Asian countries with history of authoritarian rule that I believe blocks to fostering the development of the individual. For example, I believe the insistence of maintaining focus on the group rather than individual in Japan limited its potential for drug innovation. Groups don’t come up with ideas but rather the individuals do and then the interplay of the group members improves upon it and develops a better product. The seminal idea for a product comes from an individual. I see the lack of freedom of expression in China a major obstacle to creative ideas of individuals. Chinese society lacks support for freedom of expression of thoughts and, especially, thoughts that don’t support the party line. The creative and talented Chinese architect Ai Weiwei being under house arrest for criticizing the government on human rights and lack of democracy is a good example.

Bay Area Life Science Events This Upcoming Week

  • Bio2Device Group, Tuesday Morning, April 28, 2015, Topic: “Leveraging Technology to Improve Senior Care in Assisted Living and Aging In Place,” Speaker: Paddu Govindaraj, Founder & CEO, Carevium
  • Biotech Vendor Services, Wednesday Evening, April 29, 2015, Event: Bay Area Life Sciences Community Event; Dominic’s Oyster Point – 5:00 pm – 8:00 pm.  This fun event will provide a wonderful way for fellow scientists and entrepreneurs to connect and network, and visit with the best suppliers in the industry along with having some great food, beer and wine!
  • BioScience Forum, Wednesday Evening, April 29, 2015, Title: “Pharmacokinetic & Pharmacodynamic Transformation of a Cytokine (NKTR-214) Into an Effective Cancer Immunotherapy,” Speaker: Seema Kantak, Ph.D. Vice President of Preclinical Development, Nektar Therapeutics
  • Palo Alto AWIS, Thursday Evening, April 30, 2015, Topic: “What Happened? Inside the World of Engineering and Scientific Consulting,” Speakers: Meredith Sellers, PhD, is a managing engineer who aids clients in materials analysis and incident/accident investigation pertaining to oil and gas pipelines, chemical process safety, and consumer and industrial electronics Adrienne Higa, PhD, is a senior associate who provides consulting expertise for medical device product failures, medical device regulatory affairs, trade secret and technology acquisition litigation,and vehicle safety.

You can download Audreys Picks April 26, 2015 with complete details on the above and other meetings and conferences through Dec. 2015 by right clicking the highlighted titles. Also see JobsThatCrossedMyDeskThrough April 26, 2015 for your information. I list mostly jobs in California posted in the last three weeks but you can also find national listings at the websites mentioned.

Audrey

Bay Area Life Science Events This Coming Week

  • NCC-AWIS Annual Awards and Recognition Banquet, Monday Evening, April 20, 2015; Keynote Speaker: Ann Lee-Karlon, Ph.D. –SVP, Porfolio Management and Operations, Genentech Inc., Current president and chair of the board of directors AWIS
  • Bio2Device Group, Tuesday Morning, April 21, 2015; Topic: “Natural Products as New Cancer Drugs;” Speaker: Saira Bates, Co-founder & CEO, Escend Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
  • BOLD, Tuesday Evening, April 21, 2015; Topic: “Multicultural Teams: Dream or Disaster?” Speaker: Richard Lewis, internationally acclaimed author of many books on culture including “When Teams Collide” and “Fish can’t see water”,
  • Project Management Institute, Wednesday Evening, April 22, 2015; Topic: “Negotiating Your Career—Salary and Job Negotiations”
  • Rosenman Institute, Wednesday Evening, April 22, 2015; Topic: “How To Navigate The FDA Regulatory Process And Achieve Approval For A Novel Medical Device;” Speaker: Kevin MacDonald, a 25-year veteran in obtaining FDA market approvals/clearances
  • WIB, Thursday Evening, April 23, 2015; Topic: “Careers in the Life Sciences and Transitioning from Academia to Industry;” Speaker: Toby Freedman,
  • PBSS, Friday, April 24, 2015; Topic: “Physiologically Based PK (PBPK) Modeling: Overview, Applications, Regulatory Opinions and Software Demo;” Speakers: Harvey Wong Genentech), Ping Zhao (FDA), Bernard Murray (Gilead), Yuan Chen

You can download Audreys Picks April 19, 2015 with complete details on the above and other meetings and conferences through Dec. 2015 by right clicking on the highlighted titles. Also see JobsThatCrossedMyDeskThrough April 19, 2015 for your information. I list mostly jobs in California posted in the last three weeks but you can also find national listings at the websites mentioned.

Audrey

This week I refer you to the article entitled “Academia vs. BioPharma: Young Scientists Between A Rock and A Hard Place written by Stewart Lyman which covers all the points I’ve been trying to make regarding the future of R&D jobs much better than I. I found myself saying “yes, yes, yes” as I read the piece dated April 6, 2015. So here’s the citation for you– http://www.xconomy.com/seattle/2015/04/06/academia-vs-biopharma-young-scientists-between-a-rock-and-a-hard-place/

It’s important to identify the many different jobs out there for which your training might prepare you or preferably identify many options before you finish your education. It is far better to find out what learnings will help prepare you for jobs of interest earlier rather than later. Networking early is critical to learning about jobs. I remember that I was told the only jobs for women were teaching grammar school (or in my case, high school) or nursing by career counselors in high school. At the university I was encouraged to pursue medicine but they forgot to tell me that loans weren’t available for women for studying medicine in the 1960s when I was going to school. Was I surprised to learn after I began to speak with working professionals vs. career counselors in schools that there were a breadth of job categories for which I could prepare that I never knew about.

Although there was more discrimination against women of my generation entering the professions in the U.S., I understand that women from other cultures are still experiencing the same prejudice today.

I encourage current students to find role models and listen to program speakers with interesting jobs and ask to meet with women playing different roles in the life sciences. Clearly, there are insufficient academic and bench positions at companies available today. There’s a world of opportunity but you have to put yourself out there to learn what best fits you.

Upcoming Life Science Events Week of April 12

  • Bio2Device Group, Tuesday Evening, April 14, 2015, Topic: “Novel therapies for HIV patients who have failed anti-retroviral therapies,” Ramani Aiyer, Principal, Shasta Bioventures
  • GGPF, Tuesday Evening, April 14, 2015, Topic: “Anion Exchange Membranes for Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage,” Speaker: Prof. Andrew M. Herring, Dept. of Chemical & Biological Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Co
  • CABS, Tuesday Evening, May 14, 2015, Topic: Case Studies – How to Protect Against and Avoid Legal Problems on Intellectual Property and Trade Secret in Business Partnerships, Tech Transfers, and Cross-Border Deals,” Speakers: Zheng Liu, Of Counsel, Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe; Tom Nolan, Trial lawyer, NAB Law LLC; Heather Newberry, Government Agent, FBI-San Francisco Division
  • JLABS, Wednesday Morning, April 15, 2015, Event: “From Chemical to Drug – The Path to a Small Molecule IND Best Practices When Filing Investigational New Drug Applications,” Speakers: Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson and Johnson; Christopher Flores, Ph.D. | Janssen R&D; Michael Kelley, VMD, Ph.D. | Janssen R&D; Mark Krook, Ph.D. | Janssen R&D; Donald Heald, Ph.D. | Janssen R&D; Katherine Tsokas, J.D. | Janssen R&D read bio»
  • Stanford, Friday and Saturday, April 17-18, 2015, Topic: “The PTO And The Courts;” Speakers: Steve Baughman, Ropes & Gray LLP; Judge Scott Boalick, USPTO; Prof. Dan Burk, Univeristy of California, Irvine School of Law; Aaron Capron, Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow, Garrett & Dunner; Judge Peter Chen, USPTO; Professor Dennis Crouch, University of Missouri School of Law; Andy Culbert, Microsoft; Professor John Duffy, University of Virginia; Ian Feinberg, Feinberg, Day Alberti & Thompson; Professor Robin Feldman, Hastings College of the Law; Dmitry Karshedt, Stanford Center for Law and the Biosciences; Christina McCullough, Perkins Coie; Sonal Mehta, Weil, Gotchal & Manges LLP; Magistrate Judge Paul Grewal, United States District Court Northern District of California; Naveen Modi, Paul Hastings; Judge Kimberly Moore, United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit; David O’Brien, Haynes and Boone; Sasha Rao, Maynard Cooper & Gale; Clement Roberts, Durie Tangri; Gregory Sobolski, Latham Watkins; Dr. Rose Thiessen, Knobbe Martens LLP; Lee Van Pelt, Van Pelt, Yi & James; Eliot Williams, Baker Botts L.L.P.
  • Silicon Valley ASQ, Friday Afternoon and Evening, April 17, 2015, Event: “50 Years, Your Partner in Quality”

You can download Audreys Picks April 12, 2015 with complete details on the above and other meetings and conferences through June 2015 by right clicking on the highlighted titles. Also seeJobsThatCrossedMyDeskThrough April 12, 2015 for your information. I list mostly jobs in California posted in the last three weeks but you can also find national listings at the websites mentioned.

Audrey

Posted by: Audrey Erbes | April 5, 2015

Handling Paradigm Shift in Jobs Plus Events This Coming Week

Issue of Declining Jobs Hit a Nerve

My blog on March 22 on Assault on R&D Jobs hit a nerve. I had the highest number of online reads for that posting versus all others since beginning of year. I asked question what impact increased use of artificial intelligence would have on jobs at EPPICon conference this past Saturday directed to speaker telling us that artificial intelligence was replacing human workers. He turned very serious and expressed his great concern about this potential and had no answers. Several subsequent speakers alluded to this problem and others mentioned articles they had read raising concern about sufficient jobs for population in future. I also had comments from many of my readers.

While only one of my readers told me he accepts larger numbers of professionals without work as inevitable in the economy in which we live, I find it hard to accept. This response reminds me of aristocrats from developing countries who say that there’s nothing that can be done to raise the standard of living of those in poverty—that it will always be that way.

I don’t see technology replacing teachers or healthcare workers and other service workers where the personal human touch is required. The computer was supposed to replace file cabinets and result in the paperless office back in early 1980s but it took until recent years to start to see great reductions in paper document storage. Students can listen to online lectures but still need human interaction with adult to tackle the learning, projects and assimilation of the information. Studies I’ve read show that replacing teachers with online instruction doesn’t work effectively, for example.

Our society faced these paradigm shifts with entry of industrialization and move of custom work from workshops to factories but we still need plumbers, electricians, firefighters, policemen, ambulance drivers, rescue workers and craftsmen to handle the interaction with us in our daily lives. We still need the surgeon to guide the robotic surgery tools.

We are reading that colleges are cutting back on liberal arts in favor of STEM education. I’m coming to believe that every well educated person should have a liberal arts degree or science/engineering degree with liberal arts classes to learn the cycle of history, cultural mores and how to successfully interact with other citizens and community members. We all need to know how to decipher truth and facts from opinion and how to work on a team. Music in high school has been shown to increase the success rate of students as well as the graduation rate.

I would encourage all students to also learn a skilled trade such as those mentioned above to help pay for school or use as fall back if their professional job disappears. Most of us can’t do the necessary repairs in our home on our own despite all the Home Depot and Lowes workshops. I have handymen now to handle repairs my husband used to do. Several of these had earlier careers in high tech but were fed up with the layoffs.

This issue will be a continuing one as we witness the fallout of our industry reaching the M&A heights as well as IPOs in this past year. Part of our education needs to ensure we can be flexible and adjust to these societal changes.

Upcoming Events This Week

It’s another short week of events this week as holdover from Passover and Easter holidays and spring breaks. I didn’t receive any new job listings this week so I’m not posting my usual Jobs That Crossed My Desk This Week.

  • Bio2Device Group—Serving Pharma, Biotech, Diagnostics and Devices, Tuesday Morning, April 7, 2015, Topic: “Dynamics of the Human Microbiot,” Speaker: Les Dethlefsen, PhD, Relman Lab, Stanford University
  • NCC- AWIS, Saturday Morning, April 11, 2015, Event: NCC-AWIS Career Development Workshop: Persuasive Interviewing, Keynote Speaker: Antoine de Morrée, Scientist and communication consultant that specializes in coaching other scientists in the art of persuasive communication.

You can download Audrey’s Picks with complete details on the above and other meetings and conferences through December 2015 by right clicking on the highlighted title Audreys Picks April 5, 2015.

Happy Holdiays!

Audrey

Posted by: Audrey Erbes | March 29, 2015

Drug Shortages Worsen Plus Life Science Events and Jobs

Drug Shortages Get Worse

Drug shortages with their related price increases, limitation of availaibility of product, increased flow of compounded products and increased counterfeiting to fill the vacuum have many explanations. The availability of API online as well as product containers and labels has changed the profitability of former supply situations. In the past, manufacturers and distributors had up to 3 months supply available to resolve these shortages. Now that the list which was normally in single digit numbers over 300 typically, we have to wonder if there is a solution.

Profitability issues have played a major role in limiting available alternative product sources. If there is shutdown or other closure or only available source, there is problem for patients, hospitals and physicians. An article entitled “Drug Shortages: Not Going Away Anytime Soon,” by Albert I. Wertheimer, Ph.D. published by Pharmexec.com on March 25, 2015 provides an outstanding coverage of this disturbing issue in biopharma. Unfortunately, there is no suggested solution.

Next week I’ll address the issue of declining R&D jobs as well as other life science jobs. Please provide your take on cause and more importantly, your ideas of possible solution.

Highlights of Upcoming Events

  • Bio2Device Group, Tuesday Morning, March 31, 2015, Topic: “Overexpression of Mcl-1 confers resistance to BRAFV600E inhibitor therapy in melanoma,” Speaker: Neel M. Fofaria, PhD Candidate, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, School of Pharmacy
  • BayBio, Tuesday Mid Day, March 31, 2015, Event: “Lunch & Learn | Harnessing The Power Of Big Data In Risk-Based Monitoring,” Speaker: Barbara Elashoff
  • Palo Alto AWIS, Tuesday Evening, March 31, 2015, Topic: “A color language for cultivating your intentional and inner leadership,” Speaker: Rose Chen, Founder of VegaLab Ventures
  • QB3, Wednesday Evening, April 1, 2015, Topic: “HOW TO PUT A PRICE TAG ON YOUR STARTUP,” Speaker: Burton Goldfield, President & CEO,TriNet
  • Medtech Frontiers, Thursday Evening, April 2, 2015, Topic: “Novel Fiber Optics Couplers for Biomedical Applications”

You can download Audreys Picks March 29, 2015 with complete details on the above and other meetings and conferences through May 2015 by right clicking on the highlighted titles and downloading the pdf files. Also see JobsThatCrossedMyDeskThrough March 29, 2015 for your information. I didn’t see many jobs this past week. Note I list mostly jobs in California posted in the last three weeks but you can also find national listings at the websites mentioned.

Audrey

Posted by: Audrey Erbes | March 22, 2015

Understanding the Assault on R&D Jobs Plus Event and Jobs

There appears to be a wholesale paradigm shift to run businesses with far fewer employees. A few entrepreneurs come up with new business concept, develop it and launch it. If it survives a buyout, it will be run with much smaller staff numbers than in the past. In industry we saw a reduction in overall employment, first, through technological improvements which allowed manufacturing to occur with fewer staff. We saw same trend in business jobs as modern technology replaced the need for several layers of typing and scheduling and administrative staff, for example. The administrator positon went out before that of secretary.

At Genentech, they turned over all computer research normally handled by company reference librarians to employees. The job scope of tasks increased as more “tools” became available. It isn’t clear whether or not that shift of responsibility was good or not. I suspect new positions were created in departments or the work was outsources to consultants to handle market research and analysis.

CROs replaced former large company clinical staffs which were subject to changes in need as products proceeded through development stages. CMS’s replaced need to fund and build manufacturing sites.

Then the offshoring in our industry followed that of high tech. Only those jobs which overseas staff couldn’t perform or were desirable to remain in U.S. to protect company IP had to remain in U.S. Some of the experiments to offshore life science haven’t proved to be successful as companies ran into repugnant overseas governmental actions, local country county preferences, tariffs, and local social unrest. The lack of rule of law in many of these offshore countries hadn’t been fully counted in the transactional costs.

A recent Robert Reich piece on March 16th suggests that there is a permanent trend to less available work for our citizens as result of technology innovations. “It’s now possible to sell a new product to hundreds of millions of people without needing many, if any, workers to produce or distribute it.” In his article entitled “The iEverything and Redistributional Imperative” on his website (http://robertreich.org/), he notes that “The two sectors of the economy harboring the most professionals — health care and education – are under increasing pressure to cut costs. And expert machines are poised to take over.”

It’s been noted elsewhere that Obamacare has generated many new businesses and jobs in response to its presence. These new service companies provided jobs. If Reich is correct, all those primary care docs and PAs might not be needed. And here I was hoping that resulting growth in need for medical professionals would provide new positions for displaced life science Ph. D’s, hopefully, earlier in their education.

I believe that the life science industry is undergoing a major paradigm shift with one of the changes–a massive downsizing of R&D bench jobs in biopharma. This change will also impact on the Ph.D. programs which continue to turn out more post docs for which there are not enough academic or industry jobs. This massive shift will be very painful for the professionals who developed their credentials with great personal expense, effort and sacrifice over many years. Thousands will need to reinvent themselves and transition into other professions or sectors and more will turn away from bench jobs as a career choice.

I’ve been in the industry for over 40 years and agree there have to be changes. It’s tragic that we are destroying a whole segment of jobs without any replacement for the large numbers of professionals affected. Coal miners and steel workers faced the same dilemma.

Upon reading the latest House Republican budget, I see little hope for resources to expand jobs in research or medicine. The controlling party in the House still wants to shut down Obamacare and cut into Medicaid and Social Security funding. I continue to look for hope, but my usual optimism is being challenged by the rush to save/make more money and pass the benefits on to a few in the society.

Highlights of Upcoming Life Science Events

  • PBSS, Monday, March 23, 2015, Topic: “Antibody Drug Conjugate (ADC) Based Anticancer Therapeutics: Discovery, Development, Regulatory Issues;” Speakers: Tom Pillow, Bogdan Olenyuk, Kedan Lin (Genentech); Samadhi Vithanrana (Takeda);
  • BioDesign, Monday, March 23, 2015, Event: From the Innovator’s Workshop, Speaker: Eric Topol, Director, Scripps Translational Institute, Professor of Genomics, The Scripps Research Institute
  • Bio2Device Group—Serving Pharma, Biotech, Diagnostics and Devices, Tuesday Morning, March 24, 2015, Event: “Building a medical device management team for successful growth through acquisition,” Speaker: William L. Mince
  • East Bay AWIS, Wednesday Evening, March 25, 2015, Topic: “Axygen Union City Manufacturing Tour Plus – East Bay AWIS Networking Event”
  • ASQ NCDG, Wednesday Evening, March 25, 3015, Event: “Medical Process Control Risk Management: Today’s Processes, Tomorrow’s Products,” Moderator:   Gary Seeger, CQE, CRE, VP QA/RA, Stellartech Research Corporation, Milpitas, CA, Program Chair, NCDG, RAPS/NCDG Program Chair 2009-1014, ASQ CQE, CRE; Speaker:Barry Craner, former VP QA/RA, Stellartech
  • BioScience Forum, Wednesday Evening, March 25, 2015, Topic: “Precision Drugs for Bad Bugs (“PD4BB”),” Speaker: David Martin, M.D., CEO, AvidBiotics
  • Northern California BioPharmaceutical Project Management, Friday Morning, March 27, 2015, Topic: “Ways to Accelerate Drug Development: Fast-Track, Breakthrough Designation, Accelerated Approval, Priority Review,” Speaker: Michele Bronson, Ph.D. – Vice President, Program Management, Portola Pharmaceuticals
  • EPPICon 2015, Saturday, March 28, 2015, Topic: “Digital Disruption in Life Sciences”

You can download Audrey’s Picks with complete details on the above and other meetings and conferences through May 2015 by right clicking on the highlighted titles. Also see Jobs That Crossed My Desk Through March 22, 2015 for your information. I list mostly jobs in California posted in the last three weeks but you can also find national listings at the websites mentioned.

Audrey

BioPharma Continues to Destroy R&D Staff and Facilties

I’ve written earlier about the purging of R&D staff when there’s a M&A or accountant who earns their bonus by sharply cutting costs through layoffs. Clearly, management doesn’t understand the long-term effect these short-term actions will take. John Carrol writes in FierceBio the article “Biopharma’s new normal: Constant makeovers leave R&D jobs at permanent risk” with details on the carnage with no good news as followup for these revolutionary changes. There doesn’t seem to be a successful model or plan for future behind these actions.

Tearing down institutions was recognized historically as bad idea. Case in point is the French Revolution. I guess Pharma management doesn’t study history or how such actions leads ultimately to the destruction of an industry.

There doesn’t seem to be any good solid organizational research, analysis and implementation strategies behind these apparent knee jerk moves. Has response to shareholder expectations for regular stock price increases replaced good management?

Upcoming Life Science Events This Coming Week

  • Bio2Device Group—Serving Pharma, Biotech, Diagnostics and Devices, Tuesday Morning, March 17, 2015, Topic: “Mapping the vasculature for better outcomes,” Speaker: Ron Bucher, Director Worldwide Customer Service, AccuVein
  • sfAWIS, Wednesday Evening, March 18, 2015, Event: Networking social
  • Bay Area Chapter, Project Management Institute, Wednesday Evening, March 18, 2015, March Evening Event: “Finding Joy in Project Management”
  • Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS), Wednesday Evening, March 18, 2015, Topic: ”A start-up’s view of the challenges and opportunities in consumer healthcare,” Speaker: Greg Sommer, Founder and CEO,Sandstone Diagnostics, Inc.
  • JLABS, Thursday Morning, March 19, 2015, Event: “Meet With… California Institute For Regenerative Medicine,” California Institute for Regenerative Medicine Participating Representative:Neil Littman | Business Development Officer, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine
  • Patheon, Thursday Afternoon, March 19, 2015, Topic: “Api Supply: Key Strategies For Creating Value In Early-Stage Development;” Presentations: “Supply of API for Early Development,” James Henshilwood, Ph.D. Intermune; “API Continuous Process Considerations,” Peter Poechlauer, Ph.D., Patheon; “How IP Decisions Can Add Value,” Bernie Brown, Ph.D., J.D., Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice
  • NCC ACRP, Thursday Evening, March 19, 2015, Event: “IND Basics and How an IND Can Be Adapted to Support Global Clinical Trials,” NCC ACRP Educational Event – You do not need to be a ACRP member to attend, Speaker: Meredith Brown-Tuttle, Regulatory Affairs Consultant
  • Navigating a Career Transition into the Life Sciences, Saturday, March 21, 2015; Course: MCELLBI 1002 – 002 Navigating a Career Transition into the Life Sciences 2014-2015 – Spring 2015, Instructor: Toby Freedman, Ph.D., President, Synapsis Search, Executive Recruiting for the Life Sciences, http://www.synapsissearch.com; Author, Career Opportunities in Biotechnology and Drug Development, careersbiotech.com

You can download Audreys Picks March 15, 2015 with complete details on the above and other meetings and conferences through May 2015 by right clicking on the highlighted titles. Also see JobsThatCrossedMyDeskThrough March 15 2015 for your information. I list mostly jobs in California posted in the last three weeks but you can also find national listings at the websites mentioned.

Anyone have a current list of biotech, life science and medtech companies in the Bay Area? Predecessor organization to BayBio used to provide that for modest fee. I’m getting many requests from professionals having difficulties finding employment either as new graduates or those trying to transition into a new position or sector.

Audrey

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